Don't know how to set up your TV? Here are our tips

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In stores, TVs display an image that seems incredible to you, bright and colorful? This is normal, they are set in demo mode to flatter attract your attention. In reality, the image you will have at home will be very different, and that's a good thing.

That said, once you have your new screen mounted on the wall or on its stand, you should not settle for the standard settings. Well… technically you can and most people will probably be happy with it. But if you read The Digitalsis that you are at least a little (or a lot) interested in tech.

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Filmmaker Mode is Life

To properly adjust your TV, there are not 36 settings to make. Just one word to remember: Filmmaker. As its name suggests, this mode will get as close as possible to the vision of the film maker, in other words the director. This is the profile to choose if you want your TV to deactivate all the more or less wacky settings that boost the brightness, accentuate the colors, the sharpness, and serve you this too pronounced fluidity that bothers more than one (the famous effect soap opera).

If you don't want to bother, this is really the only setting to remember, and you will then find an image close to the original work, how it was thought and projected in the cinema. To show you a concrete case, we did the test with the Hisense 65U7NQ currently in our lab.



Standard mode.


Filmmaker mode.

In this HDR and very colorful scene from the film Coconutthe Filmmaker mode displays a warm rendering and natural contrasts. In standard mode, the rendering is much too blue. And if the lights are more “bright”, the contrasts are too pushed with blacks that are too dark and a certain loss of detail in the highlights. The improvement of the fluidity is also activated and distorts the image, in our opinion. The same is true in this scene of Spiderman :

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Standard mode.


Filmmaker mode.

Our measurements confirm this with a delta E of 9.8 in standard mode, while it was only 1.9 in Filmmaker mode. This is far above the maximum threshold of 3 and the colorimetric drifts are therefore very pronounced. Similarly, the average color temperature soars to more than 10,000 K (much too blue) and the average gamma climbs much too high.



Delta E in standard mode.


Delta E in Filmmaker.

The rest is crap, but you do what you want.

Obviously, it's all a matter of taste and no one has to be a purist. You can definitely choose another mode or keep the Filmmaker mode and change some of its settings if you want to get a different result, smoother, sharper, or with a different color tone, for example.

Improving fluidity is useful when watching sports, especially to better follow the ball. Of course, you can adapt to the content you are watching, and the standard mode could for example be used when watching a TV channel, the sports mode when watching a match and keep the Filmmaker for films and series.

Be careful, some brands like TCL and Sony do not offer a Filmmaker mode and you have to make do with profiles that are close to it, but which modify the image somewhat. At Sony, it is the Professional profile that you should favor; at TCL, the Film mode.

As you will have understood, there is no rule for the image rendering that you want to display on your TV and all this is ultimately quite subjective, but we can only advise you to set your television to Filmmaker mode to avoid distorting the image and stay as close as possible to the original work.

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